City at a Time of Crisis

 

 

Tracing and researching crisis-ridden urban public spaces

in Athens, Greece.

You are here: Home \ Blog
Blog
18
Nov2013

 

 

by Antonis Vradis

 

11
Nov2013

There is an urge among many members of the Greek elites to take political and financial advantage of the crisis. Part of this urge is reflected in the ongoing attempt to re-shape the urban materiality of what used to be the commercial centre of Athens up until 2010. This is the area between Syntagma and Omonoia Square, where most shops closed down after 2010. There, according to the plans, under the label of Re-think Athens, is where a new public urban space is going to be constructed. Along with creating/destroying real estate and political values, this new public space project also aims to restrict protest demonstrations along one of the most crucial parts of the usual marching route: Panepistimiou Street.

22
Oct2013

 

 

by Antonis Vradis

14
Oct2013

 

 

by Antonis Vradis

07
Oct2013

Στο βίντεο χρησιμοποιείται ελληνική και αγγλική μετάφραση. Για μία σύνοψη του βίντεο στα ελληνικά δείτε παρακάτω.

The neo-Νazi party Golden Dawn has been active in Greece since the mid-1980s. Through the years, GD has attacked migrants, antifascists and homosexuals, often with the tolerance or even the collaboration of parts of the Greek police force. In recent years, the party saw a largely unexplained soaring in its funding, a broad coverage of its activities (whether real or fictitious) by mainstream media and the opening up of more than fifty local branches across Athenian neighborhoods and Greek cities.

30
Sep2013

Αυτό το video  θα σας υποδείξει τον τρόπο με τον οποίο μπορείτε να προσθέσετε ένα περιστατικό στο χάρτη map.crisis-scape.net

 

This video will show you how to add an incident to the map of racist attacks map.crisis-scape.net

23
Sep2013

 

 

by Antonis Vradis

 

16
Sep2013

Παρέμβαση: Επιτελώντας την κατάσταση έκτακτης ανάγκης in situ


I. Γλωσσολογικές (και άλλες) υποδείξεις

Ο Slavoj Žižek, στην εισαγωγική παράγραφο του βιβλίου του Βία – Έξι λοξοί στοχασμοί, διηγείται την εξής ιστορία. «Υπάρχει...», γράφει, «...μια παλιά ιστορία για έναν εργάτη που τον υποπτεύονται ότι κλέβει: κάθε βράδυ, την ώρα που φεύγει από το εργοστάσιο, το καροτσάκι που τσουλάει μπροστά του ερευνάται σχολαστικά. Οι φύλακες δεν μπορούν να βρουν τίποτα. Είναι πάντα άδειο. Τελικά, το μυστήριο λύνεται: εκείνο που κλέβει ο εργάτης είναι τα ίδια τα καροτσάκια...».[1] Ο Žižek, εν προκειμένω, αξιοποιεί το παράδοξο αυτής της ιστορίας για να αποκαλύψει τους κρυφούς μηχανισμούς νοηματοδότησης που ενεργοποιούνται για τις ανάγκες των εννοιολογήσεων της βίας. Στα πλαίσια μίας σχεδόν αυτόματης συνειρμικής διαδικασίας, η καθημερινή αποχώρηση του εργάτη από το εργοστάσιο με ένα καροτσάκι-μορφή, υπονοεί και προϋποθέτει εύλογα την απαραίτητη ύπαρξη ενός αντικειμένου-περιεχομένου. Ο Žižek αντιστοιχεί αυτό τον αυτοματισμό της σκέψης, για τις ανάγκες των λοξών στοχασμών του πάνω στη βία, στις «προφανείς εκφάνσεις της βίας» που καταλαμβάνουν το προσκήνιο του μυαλού μας, και οι οποίες μέσα στη δίνη των κυρίαρχων συμβολισμών αποκτούν τη γνωστή σε όλες και όλους ηθική και αξιολογική τους υπόσταση. Το άδειο καροτσάκι, πόσο μάλλον κατά την επανάληψή του, συνιστά, προφανώς, μία πράξη κενή νοήματος, αν την ερμηνεύσει κανείς σε ένα λίγο-πολύ αυτονόητο συγκείμενο. Αυτό, όμως, που κάνει ο εργάτης συνιστά μια παρέκκλιση στο πλαίσιο που ορίζει ο συγκεκριμένος αυτοματισμός. Ο εργάτης επιλέγει να κλέψει το ίδιο το καροτσάκι, αποδεικνύοντας πως αυτό που στην πρώτη ερμηνεία συνιστούσε μορφή-για-κάποιο-περιεχόμενο, αποτελεί γι' αυτόν, παραδόξως, το ίδιο το περιεχόμενο. Η ιδιότυπη διάρρηξη αυτού του σημασιολογικού συνεχούς βοηθάει τον Žižek να υποστηρίξει πως πρέπει να μάθουμε «να απαγκιστρωνόμαστε από τη σαγήνη αυτής της άμεσα ορατής «υποκειμενικής» βίας» και να προσπαθούμε να αντιλαμβανόμαστε «τα περιγράμματα του φόντου που προκαλούν τέτοια ξεσπάσματα».[2] Η προσπάθεια αυτή θα μας οδηγήσει αναπόφευκτα, κατά Žižek, στην αποκάλυψη μιας πιο θεμελιακής μορφής βίας, την οποία αποκαλεί «συμβολική», και η οποία «ενσαρκώνεται στη γλώσσα και τις μορφές της», και «χαρακτηρίζει τη γλώσσα καθαυτήν, το γεγονός ότι μας επιβάλλει ένα συγκεκριμένο σύμπαν νοήματος».[3]

02
Sep2013

Many years before the first clouds of the crisis would hover over the greek skies, amidst greek society's most glorious of moments and its most mundane of days, the lives and labour of migrants would be faced with their meticulous devaluation.

 

02
Sep2013

Many years before the first clouds of the crisis would hover over the greek skies, amidst greek society's most glorious of moments and its most mundane of days, the lives and labour of migrants would be faced with their meticulous devaluation.

 

12
Aug2013

The Greek word for privatisation is idioticopoese (ιδιωτικοποίηση) which etymologically comes from the word “making” (=poese [ποίηση]) and “private” (=idiotico [ιδιωτικό]). Namely, privatisation could be translated loosely in English as idiotication.

04
Aug2013

A short inhale, a long exhale that stretches along the few seconds it takes her to take a seat. A sense of loosening off, yet one that verges on the complete coming apart. How many times has she heard the words fly past her, the martial rhetoric, the idea that she, like everyone else around her, is supposed to have sunken into some war? But how can that be so, she will confront the idea in her head once over, when was this war ever declared... But this time, the attempt to fight off the usual arguments tires her already. Only a few seconds pass and she is now sunken into her book and thoughts instead; her gaze meticulously scanning line after line of the ink formations precisely dotted across the book's page, putting letters and words together: the abstract turns into a narrative, the fragment into a whole.

29
Jul2013

By Statewatch.org

The city at a time of crisis: Mapping racist attacks in Athens

Since the onset of the financial crisis and subsequent economic policies introduced by the EU, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund in Greece, racism and incidents of racist violence in the country have risen sharply. During 2012, the Racist Violence Recording Network (RVRN) recorded 154 incidents of racist violence. In 91 cases, victims said they believed that the perpetrators belonged to an extremist group. In "at least 8 cases, the victims or witnesses to the attacks reported that they recognised persons associated to Golden Dawn among the perpetrators." The RVRN also reported that "there is a distinct category of 25 incidents where police and racist violence are interlinked," with some attacks taking place in detention centres and police stations, while in others "the involvement of law enforcement officials in racist attacks was also reported." [1]

22
Jul2013

 

 

“Caution! One train may be hiding another.” [1]

How easy is it to lose sight? Even for the most avid of the French railway crossers, it would only take a tiny moment of deflection from the furiously moving objects lying ahead; focus on one train alone, even for a split second, reads the warning –– and another might very well come right at you from the opposite direction. Walking, jolting at one’s own pace, would require a special occasion, an exception ––a railway crossing, in the French case–– for the unforeseen and therefore, the threatening obstacle to make its appearance. But in the urban structure, the unforeseen lies all around us: what exhilarates us is our participation ––collective, to be sure–– into a structure, a scale that exceeds us and by doing so, grips us every single moment. A contradiction? Urban space is contradictory by default... our sense of intimacy lies in its anonymity; our feeling of serenity stems out of the never-ending franticness engulfing us when we stand inside it. What surrounds us is a sensationally infinite capacity yet one that we have to succumb to, nevertheless.

Page 3 of 6

Funded by

Partner Institution

About Us

City at the Time of Crisis is a research project tracing and researching the effects of the ongoing financial crisis on urban public spaces in Athens, Greece. Read more...